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[Pterraforming] The Raptodinosauroid by legendguard [Pterraforming] The Raptodinosauroid by legendguard
ANNNNND We're back! With more babbies!

This time around I showcase not a pterosaur, but a Paravid (closely related to "Deinonychosauria"). This is a remake of the bottom species presented here (sorry for lined paper), which I am now calling the Raptodinosauroid (Sapioraptor kosemen) ("Raptoid" for short). The raptodinosauroids are my second "human counterpart" for The Pterraforming Project, having both human sapience and sentience to some degree. Originally when I had first come up with this silly project, I planned on making TWO sentient species. One was the smart pterosaur that ended up being Homopteranus unliklelus, the other one was a theropod that I ended up abandoning, but returned to when thinking of possible Australian species. 

Now, before we continue, no, Velociraptors (and other maniraptors/dromaeosaurs) aren't naked mutant zombie dragon lizard things. The fenestra weren't visible. The limbs weren't ridiculously bulky and human like. The tail wasn't thick, flexible, and lizard like. The body wasn't long and ungainly. The wrists weren't pronated. And most importantly, THEY WERE COVERED IN FEATHERS. All maniraptors were, including the Dromaeosaurs. This is a good diagram showing the right and wrong body shape. Of course, the raptodinosauroid differs from Dromaeosaurs and Troodonts, most noticeably in the tail and wings, but the basics still apply. 

The pose is a bit cliche, a showcase of the side with an agape maw (although in my defense it's supposed to be calling to its raptlets), but I think it turned out nice. For the overall build, I wanted to go for a pursuit predator build this time around, so the body is built for long distance running rather than power grasping/ambushing like that of dromaeosaurs (dromaeosaurs such as Velociraptors were not runners, despite the names). The feet are longer, with the toes being more running oriented than grasping oriented, although there is some grasping capability. The tail is reduced into a short pygostyle, with elongated tail feathers for balance and to aid with sharp turns. The wings were interesting to design. The problem with most maniraptors is that the primaries were born on both the second and third digit, essentially "trapping" them. So the whole JP grabby thing is questionable at best. To counteract this, I freed the second digit and bulked up the third, which would bear the wing feathers wholly. It wouldn't be the graceful grabby fingers of us humans or the feet of H. unlikelus, but they would allow more grasping than the trapped wings of most Maniraptors. Since diapsids do not have facial muscles, I added a cockatoo like crest to help aid in non verbal communication. Now, this is an Australian species that lives predominantly in the grasslands and desert, so they would need features to help cope with the extreme Australian heat. One way was to make them smaller, no bigger than a jackdaw, to help with thermoregulation. The feathers are also shorter, helping to prevent trapping heat. Panting is also an effective way of keeping cool. The wings are small, but they are capable of flying for short bursts, although not as gracefully as that of birds or pterosaurs.

Raptoids are members of a family called Tyrranoraptoria, which are fierce Paravids native solely to Australia and New Zealand. They range in size from the giant Australian king raptor (Avedominus pratt), an Allosaurus sized beast who reigns as the dominant predator of Australia, to the tiny bushclaws (Passeraptor pollicemistic), who grow no bigger than a house sparrow. The raptoids themselves are small and easy to miss. Their feathers are camouflaged to blend in with their surroundings, and they are rather quiet when on the prowel. But don't be fooled, these little ruling raptors are smarter than they look. While their technology and social structure is rather primitive, the intelligence of this species rivals that of humans. They are capable of making and manipulating tools, building primitive shelters based on their surroundings and situations, and have developed language (although not to the degree of humans or H. unliklelus). Troops, led by females, wander around a designated territory looking for food and guarding their borders, setting up "camp" each night to rest in. Raptoids are omnivorous, and will eat a large variety of food. The teeth actually are rather broad and have serrations on them similar to that of Troodon, which actually helps them tackle a broader diet [I will be fixing the teeth in the image]. Of course, a large portion of their diet includes meat, and, with the help of tools and high endurance they can take down prey many times their own size. Like humans, raptoids are pursuit predators, and can literally chase their prey to death (which in the Australian heat usually doesn't take long). While they are quite enduring themselves, and can be quite aggressive towards each other, they are still rather timid and fragile creatures compared to humans, and are quick to flee from danger when they perceive it. They are most certainly not the vicious killing monsters the media would have you believe.

The adult individual is a female, along with the first two chicks. The last, smaller individual is male. The chicks are now a few weeks old, and the mother is now teaching them how to hunt. She calls to them with a sharp charrip! sound, keeping them close to her while they search for prey. The rest of the hunting party is not to far behind, keeping pace with the dominant female and her brood. When prey is found, she will order them to take cover and hide, then will proceed to take their hunting positions. While their troop hunts, the chicks will follow and watch their ever movement, keeping silent and out of the way as to not get hurt. The spear the mother carries will probably not be used until the end of the chase, used only to put an end to the already exhausted prey.

This will probably be getting lost of updates, especially as I study more about Paraves. As always, criticism is highly welcome. Please feel free to indulge in the scientific jargon that is speculative biology with me!

--
All current Pterraforming info and pictures can be found here in the Pterraforming folder of my gallery. You can also find it under #pterraforming #pteranosimian and #homopteranus

Other creatures in this series:
Red throated titanodactyl (a titanodactyl/titanodactylid)
Great dragon spearbeak (a spearbeak/iaculumarchid)
Bennett's false elk (an unguldactyloid/unguldactylid)
Chupacabeak (a spearbeak/iaculumarchid)
Spotted sealdont (A sealdont/sealdontid)

OR1GUNUL SPESH1EZ DONUT STEEL!!!1!111!!1111 /s
Add a Comment:
 
:iconis-kill:
is-kill Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Student General Artist
TINY FLUFFY BIRD RAPTORS
Reply
:iconlegendguard:
legendguard Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Fear us!!!
*Tiny raptor screeches*
Reply
:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
my gosh, didn't they have a smaller font in stock? XD
Reply
:iconlegendguard:
legendguard Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Guess again!
Reply
:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
point taken XD
Reply
:icondunethezangoose:
DuneTheZangoose Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Bad ass, and really scary looking. I wouldn't want to meat one :)
Reply
:iconlegendguard:
legendguard Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Don't be fooled by their looks, they see you coming towards them and they would run for the hills! After all, they're less than a foot tall, so if they saw a strange looking giant creature walking towards them it would freak them out more than anything else.

Thank you!
Reply
:icondunethezangoose:
DuneTheZangoose Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
lol, welcome :)
Reply
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